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Viking Ships 1 – by Rob Shackleford

Viking Ships 1

Viking Long Ships by Rob Shackleford

Think Vikings – think the dragon-headed Viking Long Ship

The Viking ship are described by some scholars as perhaps the greatest technical and artistic achievement of the European dark ages. These fast ships had the strength to survive ocean crossings while having a draft of as little as 50cm (20 inches), allowing navigation in very shallow water.

Their unique structure, used in Scandinavia from the Viking Age throughout the Middle Ages, were a vital part of Viking society, not only as a means of transportation, but also for the prestige that it conferred on her owner and skipper. Their ships permitted the Vikings to embark on their voyages of trading, of raiding, and of exploration.

Images of ships show up on jewelry, on memorial stones, and on coins from the Viking age. Some people were buried in ships, or ship-like settings made of stones, during the Viking age.

Two different classes of Viking era ships were found: warships called langskip and merchant ships called knörr or knarr.

Typically, a warship is narrower, longer, and shallower than a knörr, and is powered by oars, supplanted by sail. The warship is completely open and is built for speed and maneuverability. In contrast, a knörr is partially enclosed and powered primarily by sail. Cargo carrying capability was the primary concern.

Viking Knorr or knarr trade Ships by Rob Shackleford

The Longships were slender and flexible boats, with symmetrical ends with true keel. They were clinker built, which is the overlapping of planks riveted together. Some might have had a dragon’s head or other circular object protruding from the bow and stern for design, although this is only inferred from historical sources. Viking ships were not just used for military purposes, but for long-distance trade, exploration and colonization.

A typical warship might have had 16 rowers on each side.

Viking Long Ships by Rob Shackleford

The crew’s shields may have been arrayed along the gunwales, held in place by a shield rack outboard of the ship. This kept them out of the way, but also provided some slight additional protection against wind and waves.

Several pieces of evidence suggest that shields were not routinely displayed while underway. On some ships, the shields interfere with the oarholes, preventing the oars from being used. Shield racks, to which the shields were fastened, were not robust, and probably were incapable of holding the shields securely in rough seas. Last, modern sailors of replica ships say they are very impractical.

Viking Long Ships by Rob Shackleford

Find out more

http://www.hurstwic.org/history/articles/manufacturing/text/norse_ships.htm

https://avaldsnes.info/en/viking/vikingskip/

https://www.historyextra.com/period/viking/viking-ships-facts-longboat-longship-gjellestad-ship/

Books

Viking Life by John Guy and Richard Hall (Ticktock, 1998)

Encyclopaedia of the Viking Age by John Haywood (Thames &Hudson, 2000)

Cultural Atlas of the Viking Age edited by Graham-Campbell et al (Andromeda, 1994)

Penguin Historical Atlas of the Vikings by John Haywood (Penguin, 1996). Detailed maps of Viking settlements in Scotland, Ireland, England, Iceland and Normandy.

More Viking Blogs

Why Vikings?

Who Were the Vikings?

What did Vikings Look Like?

Viking Ginger Connection

Vikings Loved Bling Part 1

Viking Hygiene

Viking Clothes – Looking Good!

Viking Men’s wear

Viking Women’s Wear

Vikings Loved Bling Part 1

Viking Jewellery Part 2

Inked Up – Vikings and Tattoos

Were Vikings Inked?  Part 2

Viking Health

Viking Teeth

Viking Medicine

Vikings at Home

Viking Society

Viking Thralls

Viking Karls

Viking Jarls

Viking Women Part 1

Viking Women Part 2

Viking Women Part 3

Viking Villages and Towns

Viking Fortresses

Vikings and Cats

Vikings Loved Dogs

Viking Pet Menagerie

Live Like a Viking

 Viking Foods 1 – Day Begins

 Viking Foods 2 – Grains and Bread

 Viking Foods 3 – Vikings Ate Their Veges

 Viking Foods 4 – Sea Food

Viking Foods 5 – Fruits & Sweets 

Viking Foods 6 – Meats

 Viking Foods 7 – Booze

 Viking Meals and Feasts

 Viking Drinking Horns

 

 


About the author:

Hi, I’m Rob Shackleford. I am author of a number of novels, though so far only Traveller Inceptio and Traveller Probo have been officially published. As Traveller Inceptio looks at the fates of modern historical researchers sent to the early 11th Century Saxon world, Vikings do feature.

Below are the Amazon links for the two novels so far.

In reading my novels, I ask if you wouldn’t mind posting a review and, perhaps, a picture of yourself with my book – either paperback or on kindle. Link to me on Social Media. I most welcome your comments and images.

I hope you enjoy.

Rob Shackleford Traveller Inceptio - a novel by Rob Shackleford Traveller Probo - Book 2 of the Traveller Series by author Rob Shackleford

Check out my web site at
www.robshackleford.com

In my vain attempt to attract attention and promote my books – please check out my brief skit video:

I have other Blogs about:

Short Stories

Rob Shackleford - The Coin short story

Travelling New ZealandRob Shackleford and Deborah-Jane Mackay Travelling with Traveller Inceptio on Brecon Beacons Travelling the UKRob Shackleford and Deborah-Jane Mackay house sit Anglesey in Wales India by Royal EnfieldShacklefords ride India - Royal Enfield Bullet

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